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Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

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Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by Guest on Mon May 28, 2012 3:52 am

NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT

Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam Veteran’s Story - Our Homeless Veterans

Today, there are more than 67,000 homeless veterans in America.

Almost half of all homeless veterans in America fought in Vietnam, but there are as many as 20,000 vets who have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan and become homeless in the past five years, including women veterans with children. This number is increasing.

Private Larry Michaelis was 18 years old when he was flown into Vietnam in 1968, just after the siege of Khe Sanh began. Like other Vietnam veterans who defended the U.S., Larry did not receive a warm welcome when he returned home. And, after battling PTSD without treatment for years, Larry lost everything and became homeless.

On the 2012 “National Memorial Day Concert,” four-time Emmy award-winning star of “NYPD Blue” and Vietnam vet, Dennis Franz, will share Private Larry Michaelis’ incredible story.

Click title, the link above, or here for article and video.

http://www.pbs.org/memorialdayconcert/features/homeless-veterans.html
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by Guest on Mon May 28, 2012 4:01 am


It’s past time that Americans USV do whatever it takes, by any means necessary, to eliminate the phrase “homeless veteran” from America’s vocabulary.
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by sickchip on Thu May 31, 2012 12:56 am

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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by Guest on Thu May 31, 2012 8:58 am


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Ira Hayes
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ira Hamilton Hayes (January 12, 1923 – January 24, 1955) was a Pima Native American and an American Marine who was one of the six men immortalized in the iconic photograph of the flag raising on Iwo Jima during World War II.[1][2] Hayes was an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Community in Sacaton, Arizona, and enlisted in the Marine Forces Reserve on August 24, 1942. He trained as a Paramarine and saw action in the Pacific Theatre of World War II. On February 19, 1945, Hayes participated in the landing at Iwo Jima and fought in the subsequent battle for the island. On February 23, Hayes, together with fellow Marines Rene Gagnon, Harlon Block, Franklin Sousley, and Mike Strank, and Navy Corpsman John Bradley, raised the American flag over Mount Suribachi, an event photographed by Joe Rosenthal.

Hayes was never comfortable with his new-found fame, however, and after his honorable discharge from the Marine Corps he descended into alcoholism. He died of exposure and alcohol poisoning on January 24, 1955…




Nickname: Chief Falling Cloud

Born: (1923-01-12) January 12, 1923, Sacaton, Arizona

Died: January 24, 1955(1955-01-24) (aged 32), Sacaton, Arizona

Place of burial: Arlington National Cemetery, Section 34

Allegiance: United States of America

Service/branch: United States Marine Corps

Years of service: 1942 - 1945

Rank: Corporal

Unit: 3rd Parachute Battalion; 2nd Battalion, 28th Marines; 1st Headquarters Battalion, HQMC

Battles/wars: World War II

  • Bougainville Campaign
  • Battle of Iwo Jima





Ira Hayes' tombstone


Retrieved 31 May 2012 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ira_Hayes


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Last edited by RockOnBrother on Thu May 31, 2012 11:39 am; edited 4 times in total
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by sickchip on Thu May 31, 2012 9:17 am

Rock,

I suppose back then the 'help' to reintegrate troops returning from traumatic combat wasn't so widely available, or even recognised as being necessary. I would hope recognition of such trauma is there now, and that more professional counsel/assistance is available if needed.
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by oftenwrong on Thu May 31, 2012 11:43 am

1.
For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' "Chuck him out, the brute!"
But it's "Saviour of 'is country" when the guns begin to shoot;
An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool -- you bet that Tommy sees!

Rudyard Kipling

2.
TO WHOM EVER,

I've come to the stark realization, that even our country is guilty of
this.
We aren't treated well unless the cowardly populations are afraid.

R.P.Balfour
U.S.N. (ret.)
August 21, 2000 9:52 AM http://wonderingminstrels.blogspot.co.uk/1999/03/tommy-rudyard-kipling.html

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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by Guest on Thu May 31, 2012 12:30 pm

sickchip wrote:
Rock,

I suppose back then the 'help' to reintegrate troops returning from traumatic combat wasn't so widely available, or even recognised as being necessary. I would hope recognition of such trauma is there now, and that more professional counsel/assistance is available if needed.

It’s interesting that, of all the songs I’ve found about Vietnam vets, this one by an Ozzie group is the best.

I Was Only 19 - Redgum

Five hundred Aussies were brought home in wooden boxes.


Last edited by RockOnBrother on Fri Jun 29, 2012 6:42 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by sickchip on Thu May 31, 2012 7:46 pm

Rock

This is one of those subjects that can make one simultaneously sad, angry and frustrated.

I haven't got much else to say about it.
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by astra on Thu May 31, 2012 8:03 pm

There will be no change in the treatment of War Veterans until - - - - UNTIL the politicos and other assorted wind-up merchants have them selves, to wear camoflage, carry a burghan and weapons whilst wearing unsuitable footwear.

See the differences in treatment given to returning officers and that given to enlisted men, it stands out a mile

Since the Norman Conquest, the "Ruling Classes" have ever thought of the populace's bodies as fodder to fertilise the the mud of another country

Pitt the elder had a chance to put this right, but failed to recognise a problem.


Last edited by astra on Thu May 31, 2012 8:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by Guest on Thu May 31, 2012 8:31 pm

sickchip wrote:
Rock

This is one of those subjects that can make one simultaneously sad, angry and frustrated.

I haven't got much else to say about it.

I have this to say about it. Both your representative democracy and my representative democracy owe our war veterans more than we can ever repay.
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Re: Private Larry Michaelis: A Vietnam veteran’s story

Post by trevorw2539 on Thu May 31, 2012 10:22 pm

RoC quote

I have this to say about it. Both your representative democracy and my representative democracy owe our war veterans more than we can ever repay.
Amen to that.
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