Welcome to Cutting Edge. Guests can see and read the contents of most of the boards on this forum but need to become members to read all of them. Currently membership is instant, but new accounts may be deleted if not activated within fourteen days.

If you decide to join the forum, please open your welcome message for further details. New members are requested to introduce themselves on the appropriate thread on our welcome board.

Members may post messages and start threads, but it is essential that they read our posting rules and advice before doing so. If you have any immediate questions or queries, please post them on the suggestions board.

After posting at least ten messages, members are able to contact each other and the staff through our personal messaging system.

This forum is administrated by Ivan and moonbeam and moderated by boatlady and astradt1.

Thank you for visiting Cutting Edge.

"It's all Labour's fault!" The coalition cock-up

View previous topic View next topic Go down

"It's all Labour's fault!" The coalition cock-up

Post by Tashski on Wed Nov 13, 2013 2:38 am

This piece is anti-coalition not pro-Labour and it is important to make that distinction because the intended point of this is to argue that the mistakes of the coalition have let Labour back in similarly to how Labour's mistakes let the coalition in.

It's all Labour's fault! Well that is what we have been told for the last four years. They caused the banking crisis, they left the economy in a mess, they allowed immigration to spiral out of control and they allowed people to live the high life on benefits. Yet after all the posturing and bellowing that we should be laying the blame firmly at the door of the Labour Party things really haven't improved that much. The Labour Party did make mistakes and those mistakes cost them the last election and it would be wrong to counter the "it's all Labour's fault" with "none of it is Labour's fault". But four years after this government got into power the blaming of the previous one for everything is a way of covering up their own inadequacies; the coalition's policies that were meant to drag us back from the brink of oblivion haven't worked. In fact they have borrowed more than Labour ever did! They have continued to blame Labour despite the fact they have had more than enough time to implement their policies. Instead of accepting that their policies have failed (or are taking far longer to work than we were promised) they keep pumping out the tired line that Labour are to blame. This is becoming tiresome. Ordinary people are not feeling any better off for having this coalition government who are "making tough decisions for the good of this country"; the number of people using food banks have rapidly increased due to the depth and severity of cuts to the poor. That is something that should shame this country. In 21st century Britain people should not have to rely on charity to put food on the table for their children nor should they be choosing between eating and heating. Although it should be noted that food banks started under Labour. The "tough decisions" the coalition have made are not tough in any way, shape or form. The Liberal Democrats have sold out by jumping into bed with a party which they had direct conflict with on issues such as immigration, welfare and Trident. As a result they have had to betray nearly every popular pre-election policy they had and have potentially consigned themselves to the political wilderness for the foreseeable future. The knock on effect (which in fairness couldn't be predicted) is that UKIP could be occupying their place which is not what this country needs at all. The Liberal Democrats could argue that without their presence in government the Tories would have cut deeper than they already have but this is not enough. The Lib Dems sold themselves out and betrayed thousands of students who voted for them on the basis that they wanted to scrap tuition fees and people will not forget that in a hurry. The Tories have shown that they are blatantly not the party for change as they continue to avoid clamping down on tax havens, tax dodgers and the spiraling cost of living as corporations put astronomical profit before consumers - they are still a party of the rich for the rich.

However, the coalition have been successful in demonising the poorer end of society and causing class conflict within the working class. They have turned the working class on each other and whilst they all fight each other they are not fighting against the draconian policies that are bringing misery to their lives. There has been this carefully constructed wave of media criticism and articles highlighting extreme cases of "benefit Britain" which have fed into this perception that there is a benefit cheat on every street that is living the high life at working people's expense. A good example of this is the Jeremy Kyle show, where nearly every guest is either unemployed, on drugs, been in prison or all three and when there is a guest who is in employment the audience are encouraged to clap and cheer that person as if they are as rare as a unicorn. I even heard of an episode where Jeremy encouraged the audience to give a woman a round of applause because she knew who the father of her child was which is astonishing! You cannot blame the government for this type of show but it is the stereotypes that are paraded on the programme like cattle that are demonised by the media and held up as the norm, which is simply not true and they help form the "justification" for these savage cuts. There are those who try to cheat the system and that is a fact however, these are in the minority and should not be portrayed as being common amongst those who are on benefits. Many people who claim any of the various benefits available actually work and need to supplement their income due to being on a zero hour contract or working part time. There are not enough full time jobs to go around at this moment in time. Despite Tory claims that zero hour contracts "keep people in work" the reality is that those contracts deny people basic workers rights and mean that the people tied up in them become dependent on benefits through no fault of their own to top up their income so that they can put food on the table.  

This idea perpetuated by the coalition that "we are all in this together" is being shown up as an outright lie when policies such as the spare room subsidy or bedroom tax as it is dubbed, has been drafted up when there are millions of pounds being milked from this country through tax havens. Whilst these maybe legal that does not make it right. No ordinary working person has the option to go through a tax haven as their tax is taken before it reaches their bank account so why is it ok for one group but not another? They are a rich person's luxury. If you earn money in this country you should pay the tax rates that are set  irrespective of whether you live in London or Monte Carlo. It seems that if you're rich and wear a smart suit you can take away millions from the government and it be acceptable but if you're struggling to make ends meet and need a helping hand you're a scrounger. This simply is not fairness. The other problem with the bedroom subsidy is that there are simply not enough council houses to go around so people cannot just move into a smaller property. It is well documented that a lot of council houses were sold off in the 1980s and not rebuilt by the Thatcher, Major and Blair governments. Although the money that was made from selling the council houses was not allowed to be used to replace the properties that were sold off. The Labour government under Tony Blair should have built more social housing but they did not and the problem that stemmed from the 80s now has greater consequences for us today. The next government, whoever it maybe, must address this by not only building more social housing but also looking at the cost of private rent and working out a way of how that can possibly be capped. The Labour Party made mistakes that drove their core voters into the grateful arms of the Tories and Lib Dems; they must accept this fact and learn from it.

The coalition's actions are actually pushing voters towards the Labour Party. In some ways Labour are lucky that the coalition have made some poor decisions in office. The largest group within the electorate are beginning to grow tired of "it's all Labour's fault" and fed up at being demonised and having to bear the brunt of the economic crisis whilst the coalition allow their "friends" to get away with taking their share of the burden. The problem with all political parties is that they often do not keep their election promises and therefore people become disillusioned with them and decide to vote for another. Moreover, they are seen by many to be all scrabbling for the centre ground, none of them want to push too far left or too far right. This means that people can find it hard to distinguish between them other than the colour of their logos and ties. This alienates people and goes part of the way in explaining why voting numbers have decreased over recent elections. Each party must start keeping it's election promises and they must become distinctive from the others. The Liberal Democrats could struggle in the next election because they have come across as treacherous and Nick Clegg as a Tory whipping boy. By going into coalition with the Conservatives some of the electorate may find it hard to differentiate between the two whereas before their principles were clearly separate. As for the Tories they have shown that the slogan "the party for change" was a line a stand up comedian could be proud of. Some people took a chance on them, I heard people say "I'll give them a go because Labour aren't doing much at the moment. They might have changed." The Tories are finding hard to bridge the gap between the right wingers and the moderates within the party which was shown up explicitly during the gay marriage debate. This is a problem which parties on the right often do not encounter. Labour possibly has the best chance of being able to offer a difference at the next election because under Ed Miliband they have a change of direction to that of Blair/Brown and through the mistakes of the coalition they are able to separate themselves from those policies. But it will come down to two key questions: Can voters relate to/be pulled in by Ed Miliband? And have they won back the voters trust yet? Adam Ant once sung "music's lost its taste, time to try another flavour" well politics has lost its taste (for some) so maybe it's time to try another flavour? Which party will offer it? We just have to wait and see.
avatar
Tashski

Posts : 13
Join date : 2013-08-27
Age : 29
Location : Cornwall

http://tashb.wordpress.com

Back to top Go down

Feedback on Left Handed, Left Minded

Post by oftenwrong on Wed Nov 13, 2013 10:22 am

Feedback on "It's all Labour's fault! The coalition cock-up."
 
This article deserves the wide circulation afforded in the national media, but it should anyway resonate with the majority of Cutting Edge readers, with the possible exception of our resident firebrands.
 
I read this as a call for "Fair Government" - and who could argue against that?  It's true that our main parties are jostling for the middle-ground, which may provide an explanation for the high profile of UKIP, which is defending one specific corner of the political spectrum.  It's also obvious to us now that the Blair administration abandoned more Socialist principles than just the one in Clause 4.  The failure to resume council-house building was a particularly black mark, since the provision of shelter is a fundamental responsibility of any civilised government.
avatar
oftenwrong
Sage

Posts : 11749
Join date : 2011-10-08

Back to top Go down

Re: "It's all Labour's fault!" The coalition cock-up

Post by Tashski on Wed Nov 13, 2013 10:26 pm

Thank you for your kind feedback. I'm sure someone will disagree with me though but it adds to the fun and is what this forum is all about.

The reason I wrote it was that I had been seeing many Tory supporters on Twitter continuing to blame Labour in the same way the coalition government are doing and quite frankly it is becoming boring! And whether you vote Labour religiously, might vote Labour or never would you can see that is a tiresome and pathetically weak argument that has been worn out.

Labour made many mistakes under Blair and as a result they lost the last election but 3/4 years down the line the coalition cannot continue to blame the previous administration when they've had more than enough time to enact the policies that were meant to 'save us'. Truth is they need to deflect attention away from their failures. Labour have been gifted one hell of an opportunity for the next election - can they capitalise? I don't know.

The issue with parties grabbing the centre ground is that 1) people become disillusioned and don't vote and 2) there is a rise of parties like UKIP. Neither of this things are particularly desirable.  But also it means potentially there will be more coalition governments as no one can get an outright majority. That is one of the legacies of Blair's Labour - the centering of politics. He was successful in grabbing that ground to get Labour into power in 1997 that now all the parties want a slice (some of the more "old school" Tories think that is where Cameron is trying to pull them). This has meant they have perhaps, certainly in Labour's case, pulled away from their core support which is dangerous as they are your proverbial bread and butter and the ones who will, in all likelihood, turn out on election day.  

It is all about fairness because if a government is not there to serve its people then what is the point in it being there?
avatar
Tashski

Posts : 13
Join date : 2013-08-27
Age : 29
Location : Cornwall

http://tashb.wordpress.com

Back to top Go down

Re: "It's all Labour's fault!" The coalition cock-up

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum